Profile | Portfolio | History | Add to my artists

Shakira Masood

Shakira Masood

 

Shakira is an expressionist of the purest kind: her work is an expression of her innermost thoughts and often a social commentary. She has always been a very socially conscious painter believing that an artist's work must never be isolated from the environment around her.  Much of her work highlights social inequality and injustice.  Her subjects are almost always female but they are never bystanders in the world created on paper or canvas: they are the protagonists. They suffer and fight against their suffering, but in her world they never give up.

Shakira had a multi-cultural childhood, living in many different countries with her diplomat parents including Canada. She received her formal training at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington D.C, Philippines State University and Atelier Rodrigues in Manila, and Baghdad University in Baghdad.  The diversity of her early life helped shape the artistic influences that show up in her. When she married and moved to Pakistan, she discovered the cultural roots of her ancestry. This added another layer to the pool of experience from which she sources her inspiration.  She has remained in Pakistan since that time exhibiting regularly in all of the major cities in the country.

To Shakira the bedrock of art is honesty. If she is insincere to her work then she is being dishonest to herself. She has remained at the cutting edge of the art scene in Pakistan, touching on topics that were unfashionable in art circles at the time. Her exhibition in 1968 titled "Don't kill the birds" is still hailed as the first body of work to highlight environmental degradation in Pakistan, and considered well ahead of its time.  Her solo exhibition in Karachi in December 2004  created a stir due to the brutal frankness with which she depicted war in all its forms, and the suffering it causes, while her one- man show in Toronto in August 2005 was a tribute to Mukhtaran Mai and her struggle for justice.